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In Favour of Artistic Freedom

Published by Brunold on Do, 06/23/2016 - 11:09 in
A screenshot of the Fairy Dragon Event (fairy dragons gathering in a circle, casting rays of light which meet in the centre) and my mage attending it

Above everything else, in my opinion WoW is lacking overarching coherence and that's the greatest difference between a WoW 12 years ago and WoW in its current state. This can probably only be solved by giving its devs at least some artistic freedom. That is essentially the opposite of listening to your player base.

If you want to argue for Vanilla WoW being better than WoW's current iteration, you need to take into account that the base game was designed with significantly less feedback than any of its expansions. You can not demand that Blizzard obeyed to your superficial demands (which they probably are, since you don't get paid to analyse them and in this society people rarely do anything just because it was the decent thing to do, but only because they get paid to do so - which very much includes you).

And like it or not, this is a narrative that rarely gets told and if you'd truly try to defend an underdog view, you'd be writing comments similar to this one. Artists basically always have been society's buttmonkeys. They don't participate in so-called hard work. They rarely can make a living from it while simultaneously claiming art occupied their thoughts. They take part in make-belief, aren't satisfied with what's being presented to them, and frequently are day dreaming.

People are passionate about a project if they try to make their ideas work and occasionally compromise so they're able to present it to an audience. Being forced to implement someone else's ideas (like yours for example) is the opposite of being able to work genuinely passionately. So stop pretending that the game devs' passion was something you cared about.

In my opinion, this game needs and has earned some room to breathe. Not every small decision immediately needs to get dragged in front of a mob court. In isolation changes to convenient design always look bad because in isolation it would just be about making someone feel uncomfortable. Giving money to a stranger, especially if he or she looks like she didn't need it, may appear to be a bad thing. But that's an isolated moment of your last shopping trip. It's how you paid your last rent, or how you save money for your retirement.

Finally: If you want to design your game, go ahead! And stop telling other people what to do! This is merely a suggestion, which even lacks the force of reason, and most importantly neither stops you from doing your job, nor is it a threat. (Admittedly, it's a somewhat angry suggestion.)